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This hearty tomato rice soup is filled with healthy, nourishing, and pantry-friendly ingredients. With just a handful of steps, this recipe is super easy to make and is perfect for batch cooking. If you’d like, you have the option of adding in extra protein, like shredded chicken, turkey, or crumbled sausage!

Serving of tomato rice soup with fresh basil.

This homemade tomato and rice soup has been on our household’s rotation this winter! The addition of rice makes this one really hearty and comforting on a cold day 🙂

This is a really simple soup recipe, using pantry-friendly ingredients like canned tomatoes, basmati rice, veggie broth, and a few spices. Plus, it’s easy to whip up – simply cook the rice, let all the soup ingredients simmer in a pot, then mix the rice and soup together before digging in.

Want more dietitian-designed, nourishing soup recipes? You may also love my one-pot vegetable orzo soup, this vegetarian lasagna soup, or my creamy vegan tomato soup recipe!

Recipe ingredients in small bowls.

About the ingredients + possible substitutions

  1. Rice: I used a white basmati rice for this recipe, but you are welcome to use any rice you’d like. Do note that the type of rice you choose will affect the cooking time (with brown rice taking quite a bit longer than white rice, for instance). Because the rice is cooked separately from the soup and then stirred in, it will not affect the cooking instructions of the soup itself! This soup is also the perfect opportunity for using leftover cooked rice 😉
  2. Diced tomatoes: I used an entire 28 oz or 796 ml can of diced tomatoes with the liquids for this recipe.
  3. Yellow onion: You may add in as much onion as you’d like, depending on your preferences and tolerance. Personally, I struggle to digest onion and used only a small amount (1/2 a regular sized onion). If you love onion, you are welcome to use much more!
  4. Garlic: I used freshly minced garlic here, rather than garlic powder, for a stronger flavour.
  5. Dried basil: Added to the soup, because basil is made for tomatoes! If you don’t have dried basil, you’re welcome to use thyme or an Italian seasoning instead.
  6. Smoked paprika: Adds a touch of smokiness to this recipe!
  7. Vegetable broth: I used a low-sodium veggie broth for this recipe. If preferred, you are welcome to use a chicken broth or a regular (i.e not low sodium) version. Simply adjust how much salt you add to the soup, accordingly.
  8. Tomato paste: This helps to thicken up the broth and provides a stronger tomato flavour.
  9. Olive oil: Used to cook the onion, garlic, and spices in, while also adding flavour.
  10. Fresh basil: Added as garnish before serving for a pop of colour and a stronger basil flavour.
  11. Parmesan (optional): I served this soup with some freshly grated parmigiano-reggiano. That touch of cheesiness just pairs so well with tomato flavours here. You’re welcome to sprinkle on some nutritional yeast or dairy-free parmesan if preferred, use another cheese (like a dollop of creamy ricotta?), or omit the cheese entirely.

Full ingredient measurements and detailed instructions are located in the printable recipe card at the bottom of this post!

Tomato rice soup in a large pot.

Some tips for making this recipe

  1. Be sure to rinse the rice well before cooking. This helps to remove excess starch, so that the grains of rice are more separate when cooked (i.e. less stuck together).
  2. If you’d like this recipe to be more “soupy” and less “stewy” (lol), feel free to use less rice or more broth.
  3. If you’d like a creamy tomato soup instead of a chunky one, you may blend the soup ingredients before adding the rice. The easiest way to do this is with a handheld immersion blender – you can blend the soup directly in the pot.
  4. If you do plan on having leftovers of this recipe, I would recommend storing the rice and soup separately. This will prevent the rice from soaking up too much of the liquid. That said, you can always just add more liquid when you reheat it!
  5. Want to add more protein to this soup? I’ve left this up to you so that this soup can be enjoyed by all dietary preferences. I’d recommend adding some shredded chicken (like leftover breasts or rotisserie chicken), shredded turkey (leftover from the holidays, or you can even tear up some cold cuts), or some crumbled sausage (either a meat or vegetarian option). All would pair well from a taste perspective!

Visual guide: how to make tomato rice soup

Rice cooked in a pot.

STEP 1: Begin this recipe by cooking your rice of choice, according to package directions. Be sure to give it a good rinse in a sieve before cooking!

Onions and garlic sauteed in spices.

STEP 2: While the rice cooks, you can start on the soup. Heat olive oil in a large, deep pot over medium-high. Then, add the diced onions, minced garlic, dried basil, and smoked paprika. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

Broth and tomatoes added to pot.

STEP 3: Then, add in your diced tomatoes, tomato paste, and vegetable broth. Stir and bring liquids to a boil, then allow to simmer for 15 minutes.

STEP 4: Stir the cooked rice into the soup. If you do plan on having leftovers, you can keep things separate so that the rice doesn’t absorb too much of the liquid. Finish with some cheese and fresh basil!

Nutrition benefits of tomatoes

Tomatoes are a rich source of vitamin C and other phytochemicals that act as antioxidants, like lycopene and beta-carotene.

These antioxidants help to reduce risk of many chronic illnesses, such as heart disease and cancer. They also have other beneficial effects, such as promoting skin health.

In addition, tomatoes are a good source of:

  • dietary fiber (important for gut health, heart health, and blood sugar control)
  • potassium (important for blood pressure control)
  • folate (important for normal tissue growth + cell function)
  • vitamin K (important for blood clotting + bone health)

Nutrition benefits of rice

Whether you choose to make this soup with white or brown rice, do know that both varieties have plenty of nutrition benefits!

As mentioned, I made this recipe with white basmati rice – mostly for flavour, and for the much quicker cooking time. While brown rice does contain more fiber, white rice is often enriched to have nutrients added back in.

Enriched white rice still a source of:

  • plant-based protein
  • folate
  • manganese
  • thiamine (B1)
  • selenium
  • niacin (B3)
  • iron
  • vitamin B6
Tomato rice soup served in a bowl.

More healthy soup recipes

Did you give this Tomato Rice Soup Recipe a try? Let me know by leaving a comment and recipe rating below!

If you do make this recipe, don’t forget to tag me on Instagram or Pinterest – seeing your creations always makes my day. You can also subscribe to my email list to never miss a new recipe or nutrition education post!

Get the Recipe: Tomato Rice Soup (Simple, Healthy & Hearty!)

This hearty tomato rice soup is filled with healthy, nourishing, and pantry-friendly ingredients. If you'd like, you have the option of adding in extra protein, like shredded chicken, turkey, or crumbled sausage!
Serving of tomato rice soup with fresh basil.
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5 from 1 vote
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Ingredients

Instructions

  • PREP: dice onion and mince garlic. Rinse rice in a sieve for 1-2 minutes to remove excess starch.
  • Cook rice according to package directions. When done, leave the lid on until ready to add to the soup. This will allow the rice to steam and become more fluffy.
  • While rice cooks, heat olive oil in a large, deep pot over medium-high. Then, add the diced onions, minced garlic, dried basil, and smoked paprika. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Next, add in the diced tomatoes, tomato paste, and vegetable broth. Stir and bring liquids to a boil, then allow to simmer (uncovered) for 15 minutes.
  • Fluff the rice with a fork, then stir it into the soup. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  • Serve soup into bowls and top with grated parmesan or a dollop of ricotta (if using). Garnish with fresh basil and enjoy hot!

Notes

Want to use a different type of rice? I used a white basmati rice for this recipe, but you are welcome to use any rice you’d like. Do note that the type of rice you choose will affect the cooking time (with brown rice taking quite a bit longer than white rice, for instance). Because the rice is cooked separately from the soup and then stirred in, it will not affect the cooking instructions of the soup itself! This soup is also the perfect opportunity for using leftover cooked rice.
If you’d like a creamy tomato soup instead of a chunky one, you may blend the soup ingredients before adding in the rice. The easiest way to do this is with a handheld immersion blender – you can blend the soup directly in the pot.
If you’d like this recipe to be more “soupy” and less “stewy” (you know what I mean lol!), feel free to use less rice or more broth/water.
Leftovers will keep for 3-5 days in an airtight container in the fridge. You can reheat them on the stovetop or in the microwave, adding more broth or water if needed.
If you do plan on having leftovers of this recipe, I would recommend storing the rice and soup separately (instead of mixing it all together). This will prevent the rice from soaking up too much of the liquid. That said, you can always just add more liquid when you reheat it!
Want to add more protein to this soup? I’ve left this up to you so that this soup can be enjoyed by all dietary preferences. I’d recommend stirring in some shredded chicken (like leftover breasts or rotisserie chicken), shredded turkey (leftover from the holidays, or you can even tear up some cold cuts), or some crumbled sausage (either a meat or vegetarian option).
Calories: 380kcal | Carbohydrates: 53g | Protein: 11g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 306mg | Potassium: 592mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 963IU | Vitamin C: 21mg | Calcium: 218mg | Iron: 4mg

Nutrition

As a dietitian, I create recipes with whole food ingredients that provide the nutrients needed for optimal health. My nutrition philosophy does not focus on numbers; however, I understand that this information can be helpful.

Do note that the nutrition info provided is an estimate and I cannot guarantee correctness of the displayed values. These numbers will differ depending on brands used, recipe modifications, and amount eaten. If you require specific nutrition information due to medical reasons, please consult with your dietitian or physician.

Did you make this recipe?

Let me know by leaving a recipe rating below, or by tagging @walderwellness on Instagram. I love seeing your beautiful creations!

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